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 Miniature elf homes are seen all over Iceland, mainly for making the tourists smile. Real elf homes cannot be seen by the human eye without accessing another dimension and are usually found within rocks and trees.

Miniature elf homes are seen all over Iceland, mainly for making the tourists smile. Real elf homes cannot be seen by the human eye without accessing another dimension and are usually found within rocks and trees.

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  Every Friday afternoon Magnus Skarphedinsson hosts an elf school on the first floor of an office building in Reykjavik. Squeezed in amongst the piles of books and huldufólk memorabilia, Magnus shares the hundreds of stories collected from all over Iceland. The school is clearly targeted at tourists, taking advantage of curious visitors who have heard that Icelanders believe in elves. The pot on the table, Magnus reveals as he passes it around at the end of the class, is an elf pot and was a gift from an elf to a human. 

Every Friday afternoon Magnus Skarphedinsson hosts an elf school on the first floor of an office building in Reykjavik. Squeezed in amongst the piles of books and huldufólk memorabilia, Magnus shares the hundreds of stories collected from all over Iceland. The school is clearly targeted at tourists, taking advantage of curious visitors who have heard that Icelanders believe in elves. The pot on the table, Magnus reveals as he passes it around at the end of the class, is an elf pot and was a gift from an elf to a human. 

 At the end of the 1970s preparations were made for a new road in the Skagafjörður district of Northern Iceland. The original plan was to detonate some rocks over Tröllaskard (The Troll's Pass) in order to lower the level of the road. But the work was halted when a medium named Hafsteinn Björsson warned that the site was cursed. Unable to come to an agreement with the supernatural beings residing in the rocks, they were left alone and the road was built to accomodate them. Now the road has a noticeable and dangerous blind spot.

At the end of the 1970s preparations were made for a new road in the Skagafjörður district of Northern Iceland. The original plan was to detonate some rocks over Tröllaskard (The Troll's Pass) in order to lower the level of the road. But the work was halted when a medium named Hafsteinn Björsson warned that the site was cursed. Unable to come to an agreement with the supernatural beings residing in the rocks, they were left alone and the road was built to accomodate them. Now the road has a noticeable and dangerous blind spot.

 14 year old Sólbjört spends the summer months in the remote town of Borgarfjörður. The town is famous for two things: its colony of puffins and Álfaborg rock where the Queen of the Elves Borghildur is said to live. Like many children in Iceland, she grew up hearing the stories of the hidden people and still likes to believe they exist. As a child she would often go to Álfaborg rock and leave the elves nice gifts like a bracelet. She would then lie down, keep very still and try hard to hear them.

14 year old Sólbjört spends the summer months in the remote town of Borgarfjörður. The town is famous for two things: its colony of puffins and Álfaborg rock where the Queen of the Elves Borghildur is said to live. Like many children in Iceland, she grew up hearing the stories of the hidden people and still likes to believe they exist. As a child she would often go to Álfaborg rock and leave the elves nice gifts like a bracelet. She would then lie down, keep very still and try hard to hear them.

   
  
 
  
    
  
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    In 1971 a new road was being built out of Reykjavik. Along its route lay a prominent rock known as Grásteinn (Grey Rock) that needed to be moved in order to complete the new road. But stories began to circulate that the rock was inhabited by elves and that accidents would befall anyone who tried to remove it. The rock was moved, and in a nearby lake 90,000 fish were soon found dead. The financial loss for the community was devastating and the elves were held responsible.

In 1971 a new road was being built out of Reykjavik. Along its route lay a prominent rock known as Grásteinn (Grey Rock) that needed to be moved in order to complete the new road. But stories began to circulate that the rock was inhabited by elves and that accidents would befall anyone who tried to remove it. The rock was moved, and in a nearby lake 90,000 fish were soon found dead. The financial loss for the community was devastating and the elves were held responsible.

 On September 6th 2012, the Queen of Álfaborg rock in Borgarfjörďur was seen by Jóna Oskarsdóttir whilst on a camping trip with her husband. Although a psychic who can see dead people she claims that before having this experience she had never seen elves or huldufólk. She has since been back to the rock and claims to have seen many more.

On September 6th 2012, the Queen of Álfaborg rock in Borgarfjörďur was seen by Jóna Oskarsdóttir whilst on a camping trip with her husband. Although a psychic who can see dead people she claims that before having this experience she had never seen elves or huldufólk. She has since been back to the rock and claims to have seen many more.

 The small town of Harfnarfjörđur has become well-known by tourists for its high population of elves and hidden people. The large rock named Hammanin which overlooks the town is said to be the home of the Elf Palace where the royal family of elves live. In 1950 three boys were playing on Hammanin when one boy fell down a very steep slope. He was rushed to the doctors but miraculously he wasn’t injured. He explained that as he fell hands came out of the rock and carried him all the way down the hill. The doctor, shocked, agreed that there was no other possible explanation.

The small town of Harfnarfjörđur has become well-known by tourists for its high population of elves and hidden people. The large rock named Hammanin which overlooks the town is said to be the home of the Elf Palace where the royal family of elves live. In 1950 three boys were playing on Hammanin when one boy fell down a very steep slope. He was rushed to the doctors but miraculously he wasn’t injured. He explained that as he fell hands came out of the rock and carried him all the way down the hill. The doctor, shocked, agreed that there was no other possible explanation.

 In the Eastern town of Fáskrúđsfjörđur, Berglind sits in the rock ‘throne’ she would sit in as a child. She can’t say for sure whether she just had a vivid imagination or if it was something else, but Berglind used to have an elf friend who she would play with for hours in these mountains behind her childhood home. He was blonde with curly hair and used to wear the most beauitful blue dress over leggings. Berglind stopped going here as a teenager, self-conscious about what her peers would think of her. When she returned 20 years later, she could no longer see him. There is a sadness in her voice as she remembers her dear friend.

In the Eastern town of Fáskrúđsfjörđur, Berglind sits in the rock ‘throne’ she would sit in as a child. She can’t say for sure whether she just had a vivid imagination or if it was something else, but Berglind used to have an elf friend who she would play with for hours in these mountains behind her childhood home. He was blonde with curly hair and used to wear the most beauitful blue dress over leggings. Berglind stopped going here as a teenager, self-conscious about what her peers would think of her. When she returned 20 years later, she could no longer see him. There is a sadness in her voice as she remembers her dear friend.

 In February 2014 the disruption of a new road being built at Galgahraún made international news. A local clairvoyant named Ragnhildur Jónsdóttir claimed an elf had come to her in a dream begging for her help to protect an elf church which was right in the path of the new road. After months of negotiations and protest, it was finally agreed that the elves would be satisfied if the rock was moved a few metres away and placed next to a rock known as an elf cathedral.

In February 2014 the disruption of a new road being built at Galgahraún made international news. A local clairvoyant named Ragnhildur Jónsdóttir claimed an elf had come to her in a dream begging for her help to protect an elf church which was right in the path of the new road. After months of negotiations and protest, it was finally agreed that the elves would be satisfied if the rock was moved a few metres away and placed next to a rock known as an elf cathedral.

 Standing by the elf church known as Ófeigskirkja, Pétur works for VEGAGERDIN the Icelandic Road Agency that was at the centre of the disruption last year. VEGAGERDIN make it very clear that they do not believe in elves or supernatural beings, but that they work to respect the culture and the requests of certain people in Iceland.

Standing by the elf church known as Ófeigskirkja, Pétur works for VEGAGERDIN the Icelandic Road Agency that was at the centre of the disruption last year. VEGAGERDIN make it very clear that they do not believe in elves or supernatural beings, but that they work to respect the culture and the requests of certain people in Iceland.

 Sitting in the Elf Garden of Hafnarfjörđur, Ragnhildur explains she is tired of the attention from journalists since she was at the centre of the battle to save the elf church at Galgahraún. When the elves asked her to be their spokesperson they promised her an adventure, she smiles, “…and it certainly has been.” Ragnhildur has seen elves as far back as she can remember, her mother telling her that as soon as she began to talk she would speak of her elf friend, Pulda. Today she will receive the verdict from High Court as to whether she is guilty of disobeying police orders during the protests to protect the elf church Ófeigskirkja.

Sitting in the Elf Garden of Hafnarfjörđur, Ragnhildur explains she is tired of the attention from journalists since she was at the centre of the battle to save the elf church at Galgahraún. When the elves asked her to be their spokesperson they promised her an adventure, she smiles, “…and it certainly has been.” Ragnhildur has seen elves as far back as she can remember, her mother telling her that as soon as she began to talk she would speak of her elf friend, Pulda. Today she will receive the verdict from High Court as to whether she is guilty of disobeying police orders during the protests to protect the elf church Ófeigskirkja.

 In the garden of the National Church of Iceland in Hafnarfjörđur lies a small rock known as the Dvergasteinn (Dwarf Stone). The rock remained undisturbed during the construction of the church as it is believed that supernatural beings live inside.

In the garden of the National Church of Iceland in Hafnarfjörđur lies a small rock known as the Dvergasteinn (Dwarf Stone). The rock remained undisturbed during the construction of the church as it is believed that supernatural beings live inside.

  In 2005 a young girl was playing by a rock by her home known to be inhabited by elves. As she was playing she discovered the elves had left her a gift; some small gem stones not native to Iceland. These were donated to the Elf School in Reykjavik and will soon form part of the new Elf museum.

In 2005 a young girl was playing by a rock by her home known to be inhabited by elves. As she was playing she discovered the elves had left her a gift; some small gem stones not native to Iceland. These were donated to the Elf School in Reykjavik and will soon form part of the new Elf museum.

Miniature elf homes are seen all over Iceland, mainly for making the tourists smile. Real elf homes cannot be seen by the human eye without accessing another dimension and are usually found within rocks and trees.

Every Friday afternoon Magnus Skarphedinsson hosts an elf school on the first floor of an office building in Reykjavik. Squeezed in amongst the piles of books and huldufólk memorabilia, Magnus shares the hundreds of stories collected from all over Iceland. The school is clearly targeted at tourists, taking advantage of curious visitors who have heard that Icelanders believe in elves. The pot on the table, Magnus reveals as he passes it around at the end of the class, is an elf pot and was a gift from an elf to a human. 

At the end of the 1970s preparations were made for a new road in the Skagafjörður district of Northern Iceland. The original plan was to detonate some rocks over Tröllaskard (The Troll's Pass) in order to lower the level of the road. But the work was halted when a medium named Hafsteinn Björsson warned that the site was cursed. Unable to come to an agreement with the supernatural beings residing in the rocks, they were left alone and the road was built to accomodate them. Now the road has a noticeable and dangerous blind spot.

14 year old Sólbjört spends the summer months in the remote town of Borgarfjörður. The town is famous for two things: its colony of puffins and Álfaborg rock where the Queen of the Elves Borghildur is said to live. Like many children in Iceland, she grew up hearing the stories of the hidden people and still likes to believe they exist. As a child she would often go to Álfaborg rock and leave the elves nice gifts like a bracelet. She would then lie down, keep very still and try hard to hear them.

In 1971 a new road was being built out of Reykjavik. Along its route lay a prominent rock known as Grásteinn (Grey Rock) that needed to be moved in order to complete the new road. But stories began to circulate that the rock was inhabited by elves and that accidents would befall anyone who tried to remove it. The rock was moved, and in a nearby lake 90,000 fish were soon found dead. The financial loss for the community was devastating and the elves were held responsible.

On September 6th 2012, the Queen of Álfaborg rock in Borgarfjörďur was seen by Jóna Oskarsdóttir whilst on a camping trip with her husband. Although a psychic who can see dead people she claims that before having this experience she had never seen elves or huldufólk. She has since been back to the rock and claims to have seen many more.

The small town of Harfnarfjörđur has become well-known by tourists for its high population of elves and hidden people. The large rock named Hammanin which overlooks the town is said to be the home of the Elf Palace where the royal family of elves live. In 1950 three boys were playing on Hammanin when one boy fell down a very steep slope. He was rushed to the doctors but miraculously he wasn’t injured. He explained that as he fell hands came out of the rock and carried him all the way down the hill. The doctor, shocked, agreed that there was no other possible explanation.

In the Eastern town of Fáskrúđsfjörđur, Berglind sits in the rock ‘throne’ she would sit in as a child. She can’t say for sure whether she just had a vivid imagination or if it was something else, but Berglind used to have an elf friend who she would play with for hours in these mountains behind her childhood home. He was blonde with curly hair and used to wear the most beauitful blue dress over leggings. Berglind stopped going here as a teenager, self-conscious about what her peers would think of her. When she returned 20 years later, she could no longer see him. There is a sadness in her voice as she remembers her dear friend.

In February 2014 the disruption of a new road being built at Galgahraún made international news. A local clairvoyant named Ragnhildur Jónsdóttir claimed an elf had come to her in a dream begging for her help to protect an elf church which was right in the path of the new road. After months of negotiations and protest, it was finally agreed that the elves would be satisfied if the rock was moved a few metres away and placed next to a rock known as an elf cathedral.

Standing by the elf church known as Ófeigskirkja, Pétur works for VEGAGERDIN the Icelandic Road Agency that was at the centre of the disruption last year. VEGAGERDIN make it very clear that they do not believe in elves or supernatural beings, but that they work to respect the culture and the requests of certain people in Iceland.

Sitting in the Elf Garden of Hafnarfjörđur, Ragnhildur explains she is tired of the attention from journalists since she was at the centre of the battle to save the elf church at Galgahraún. When the elves asked her to be their spokesperson they promised her an adventure, she smiles, “…and it certainly has been.” Ragnhildur has seen elves as far back as she can remember, her mother telling her that as soon as she began to talk she would speak of her elf friend, Pulda. Today she will receive the verdict from High Court as to whether she is guilty of disobeying police orders during the protests to protect the elf church Ófeigskirkja.

In the garden of the National Church of Iceland in Hafnarfjörđur lies a small rock known as the Dvergasteinn (Dwarf Stone). The rock remained undisturbed during the construction of the church as it is believed that supernatural beings live inside.

In 2005 a young girl was playing by a rock by her home known to be inhabited by elves. As she was playing she discovered the elves had left her a gift; some small gem stones not native to Iceland. These were donated to the Elf School in Reykjavik and will soon form part of the new Elf museum.

 Miniature elf homes are seen all over Iceland, mainly for making the tourists smile. Real elf homes cannot be seen by the human eye without accessing another dimension and are usually found within rocks and trees.
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  Every Friday afternoon Magnus Skarphedinsson hosts an elf school on the first floor of an office building in Reykjavik. Squeezed in amongst the piles of books and huldufólk memorabilia, Magnus shares the hundreds of stories collected from all over Iceland. The school is clearly targeted at tourists, taking advantage of curious visitors who have heard that Icelanders believe in elves. The pot on the table, Magnus reveals as he passes it around at the end of the class, is an elf pot and was a gift from an elf to a human. 
 At the end of the 1970s preparations were made for a new road in the Skagafjörður district of Northern Iceland. The original plan was to detonate some rocks over Tröllaskard (The Troll's Pass) in order to lower the level of the road. But the work was halted when a medium named Hafsteinn Björsson warned that the site was cursed. Unable to come to an agreement with the supernatural beings residing in the rocks, they were left alone and the road was built to accomodate them. Now the road has a noticeable and dangerous blind spot.
 14 year old Sólbjört spends the summer months in the remote town of Borgarfjörður. The town is famous for two things: its colony of puffins and Álfaborg rock where the Queen of the Elves Borghildur is said to live. Like many children in Iceland, she grew up hearing the stories of the hidden people and still likes to believe they exist. As a child she would often go to Álfaborg rock and leave the elves nice gifts like a bracelet. She would then lie down, keep very still and try hard to hear them.
   
  
 
  
    
  
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    In 1971 a new road was being built out of Reykjavik. Along its route lay a prominent rock known as Grásteinn (Grey Rock) that needed to be moved in order to complete the new road. But stories began to circulate that the rock was inhabited by elves and that accidents would befall anyone who tried to remove it. The rock was moved, and in a nearby lake 90,000 fish were soon found dead. The financial loss for the community was devastating and the elves were held responsible.
 On September 6th 2012, the Queen of Álfaborg rock in Borgarfjörďur was seen by Jóna Oskarsdóttir whilst on a camping trip with her husband. Although a psychic who can see dead people she claims that before having this experience she had never seen elves or huldufólk. She has since been back to the rock and claims to have seen many more.
 The small town of Harfnarfjörđur has become well-known by tourists for its high population of elves and hidden people. The large rock named Hammanin which overlooks the town is said to be the home of the Elf Palace where the royal family of elves live. In 1950 three boys were playing on Hammanin when one boy fell down a very steep slope. He was rushed to the doctors but miraculously he wasn’t injured. He explained that as he fell hands came out of the rock and carried him all the way down the hill. The doctor, shocked, agreed that there was no other possible explanation.
 In the Eastern town of Fáskrúđsfjörđur, Berglind sits in the rock ‘throne’ she would sit in as a child. She can’t say for sure whether she just had a vivid imagination or if it was something else, but Berglind used to have an elf friend who she would play with for hours in these mountains behind her childhood home. He was blonde with curly hair and used to wear the most beauitful blue dress over leggings. Berglind stopped going here as a teenager, self-conscious about what her peers would think of her. When she returned 20 years later, she could no longer see him. There is a sadness in her voice as she remembers her dear friend.
 In February 2014 the disruption of a new road being built at Galgahraún made international news. A local clairvoyant named Ragnhildur Jónsdóttir claimed an elf had come to her in a dream begging for her help to protect an elf church which was right in the path of the new road. After months of negotiations and protest, it was finally agreed that the elves would be satisfied if the rock was moved a few metres away and placed next to a rock known as an elf cathedral.
 Standing by the elf church known as Ófeigskirkja, Pétur works for VEGAGERDIN the Icelandic Road Agency that was at the centre of the disruption last year. VEGAGERDIN make it very clear that they do not believe in elves or supernatural beings, but that they work to respect the culture and the requests of certain people in Iceland.
 Sitting in the Elf Garden of Hafnarfjörđur, Ragnhildur explains she is tired of the attention from journalists since she was at the centre of the battle to save the elf church at Galgahraún. When the elves asked her to be their spokesperson they promised her an adventure, she smiles, “…and it certainly has been.” Ragnhildur has seen elves as far back as she can remember, her mother telling her that as soon as she began to talk she would speak of her elf friend, Pulda. Today she will receive the verdict from High Court as to whether she is guilty of disobeying police orders during the protests to protect the elf church Ófeigskirkja.
 In the garden of the National Church of Iceland in Hafnarfjörđur lies a small rock known as the Dvergasteinn (Dwarf Stone). The rock remained undisturbed during the construction of the church as it is believed that supernatural beings live inside.
  In 2005 a young girl was playing by a rock by her home known to be inhabited by elves. As she was playing she discovered the elves had left her a gift; some small gem stones not native to Iceland. These were donated to the Elf School in Reykjavik and will soon form part of the new Elf museum.